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日本語ネイティブさん100人に聞きました!

100 native Japanese speakers have answered  the Sunshine questionnaires! 

The survey result and overall impression

You can check what the surveys were conducted, the results, the overall impressions. The important thing for this information is that the results don't show which are correct but they show just what the native speakers have answered now. The language is changing.

If you could send your voice to me, that would be wonderful. I would like to improve and develop the future surveys.
 

#3 「あなた」 (4th March 2021)

You learnt 'anata' for you in Japanese, didn't you. Of course, that's correct; however, this survey asked whether the native actually say 'anata' to their friends. In the survey, the target was only to friends, not family, strangers, anyone except friends.

There were 213 respondents.

[ Result ]

I use 'anata' to friends: 7%

I don't use 'anata' to friends: 93%

[ Overall impression ]

The majority of the comments pointed that 'anata' used to them sounded a distance from that friend and/or cold, and it also sounded looking down. Some said that they didn't know why and just didn't use it. The native use the friend's name instead of 'anata', in the same way when they talk about the third party.

#2 「ありがとうございます」VS「すみません」 (16th January 2021)

What would you say thank you in Japanese? Both 'Arigato gozaimasu' and  'Sumimasen' are used for thank you in Japanese. This survey focuses on the situation where you need to show your gratitude to a stranger who did something for you. It was asked whether the native say arigato gozaimasu or sumimasen to the helpful strangers.

There were 102 respondents.

[ Result ]

Arigato gozaimasu: 66%

Sumimasen: 34%

[ Overall impression ]

'Sumimasen' is used for 'sorry' as well; therefore, most of respondents with arigato gozaimasu associate sumimasen with the negative imagination and they a kind of force themselves to use 'arigato gozaimasu' instead of naturally saying it.

 

 


#1 「おはようございます」 (25th November 2020)

'Ohayo gozaimasu' means good morning; however, the greeting is used in the slightly different timing. Also, the timing is unclear for the natives either. Then, this survey asked when the native switch the greetings from ohayo gozaimasu to konnichiwa which means good afternoon or good day in English. 

There were 77 respondents.

[ Result ]

When it has passed 9:30am: 3%

When it has passed 10:00am: 40%

When it has passed 10:30am: 16%

When it has passed 11:00am: 34%

Others: 6% (e.g.  9am; 12pm)

{ Overall impression ]

Most of the people who responded to this question had never thought about that. They are quite flexible. They can give the same greeting back to a person who gives you first. Also, their work time influences a lot. If they start work early, their ohayo time will be over early as well. 

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